DaShawn Horne rests in his new bedroom on the first floor shortly after arriving home from spending 103 nights at Harborview Medical Center, on Thursday, May 3, 2018, at his home in Auburn.

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                                                          Life after Hate 





“Homie. Get the fuck up, homie.” The voice behind the iPhone camera is raspy, like the person speaking had just exhausted his voice screaming.

The video shows 26-year-old DaShawn Horne, lying face down on a pile of rocks, unconscious, blood streaming down his face.

“That’s what happens to these n————rs out here, huh,” 18-year-old Julian Tuimauga continues, his voice ratcheting up with intensity. “THAT’S WHAT HAPPENS TO YOU N————RS OUT HERE, BOY.”

From the side of the frame, the weapon Tuimauga used to beat DaShawn over the head within an inch of his life appears: a 32-inch aluminum baseball bat.

Police thought they were responding to a homicide. But when they arrived, DaShawn was still breathing.

The attack lasted a matter of minutes but left DaShawn in a coma at Harborview Medical Center for six weeks. Over a year later, he’s still recovering.

Hate crimes have been on the rise since 2011 in Seattle. In 2017, there were 234 hate-motived assaults in the city, almost double from the previous year. According to the FBI, African-Americans were the most targeted both years.

But after news headlines on hate crimes fade, victims and their families live with their assaults much longer.  

Visit kuow.org to see the full story.

Cards and flowers fill a windowsill next to the small cot where LaDonna Horne slept on Thursday, March 15, 2018, in DaShawn Horne's room at Harborview Medical Center in Seattle. "The outpour was just pure love," LaDonna said. "Strangers from all over. I didn’t know any of these people, but we’re friends now."

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Surgeons removed part of DaShawn's skull to relieve the pressure and to drain the blood clotting around his brain. The operation left a dent on the left side of his head. Here, LaDonna Horne stands next to her son, DaShawn, in his hospital room on Thursday, March 15, 2018, at Harborview Medical Center in Seattle.

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LaDonna Horne, center, holds a candle during a healing and justice vigil for her son, DaShawn Horne, on Saturday, February 3, 2018, outside of the hospital at Harborview Park in Seattle.

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LaDonna Horne becomes emotional after one of the first times that her son, DaShawn Horne, made a sound on Thursday, March 15, 2018, at Harborview Medical Center in Seattle. Three days later, DaShawn spoke words that could be understood.

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A picture of DaShawn Horne holding his son Deion is taped to a poster on the wall of his hospital room on Friday, April 13, 2018, at Harborview Medical Center in Seattle.

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DaShawn Horne buckles the belt of his wheelchair while wearing a t-shirt with his picture and the words #shawniswoke, on Thursday, April 19, 2018, during physical therapy at Harborview Medical Center in Seattle.

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LaDonna Horne smiles as her son, DaShawn Horne, raises his fist in the air in celebration as he leaves the hospital after 103 days with the help of his nurse Derek Bergey, on Thursday, May, 3, 2018, at Harborview Medical Center in Seattle.

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DaShawn Horne rests in his newly converted bedroom on the first floor shortly after arriving home from spending 103 days at hospital, on Thursday, May 3, 2018, at their home in Auburn. "DaShawn, what year is it?" LaDonna asked. "2010," he answered. She corrected him, as she always did: It was May 3rd, 2018. 

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LaDonna Horne is reflected in a mirror as she sits on her son DaShawn Horne's bed after they arrived home from the hospital on Thursday, May 3rd, 2018, at their home in Auburn. “I think I finally just took a deep breath,” LaDonna said.

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DaShawn's 24-year-old sister Da'Nesha walks with her arm around him after a physical therapy appointment on Wednesday, June 13, 2018, at Harborview Medical Center in Seattle. Da'Nesha came home from Eastern Washington University where she was working toward a degree in Psychology to be his full-time caregiver.

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Surgeons complete DaShawn Horne's cranioplasty surgery, where the portion of his skull that was removed in January was returned, on Thursday, June 28, 2018, at Harborview Medical Center in Seattle. His cranial bone was stored in a freezer bank for five months. Two days before the operation, DaShawn asked LaDonna when the surgery was. “I need to get my new brain because this one isn’t working right,” he told her. He wasn’t getting a new brain, LaDonna told him gently.

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DaShawn Horne kisses his son Deion, now 2, held by his mother Vanessa, on Thursday, July 26, 2018, after playing basketball in front of the Horne's home in Auburn.

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DaShawn Horne has a CT scan on Wednesday, November 14, 2018, at Harborview Medical Center in Seattle.

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DaShawn Horne looks in the mirror while shaving on Thursday, November 15, 2018, the night before Julian Tuimauga's sentencing, at his home in Auburn.

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A photo copy of a letter that DaShawn wrote to King County Superior Court Judge Julia Garratt is shown on November, 15, 2018.

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DaShawn Horne, center, walks into the courtroom with his mother, LaDonna Horne, right, his mother's partner Rajah Cooper, second from right, and his caregiver Lynnae Fletcher, second from left, before Tuimauga's sentencing on Friday, November 16, 2018, at the Maleng Regional Justice Center in Kent.

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Julian Tuimauga, left, listens as the video that that he took immediately after the beating plays for the judge, with his defense attorney Robert Huff on Friday, November 16, 2018, during his sentencing at the Maleng Regional Justice Center in Kent. He was given the maximum sentence, 13.3 years. 

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DaShawn Horne looks into a mirror after having his hair cut at Salon Edwards on New Years Eve, Monday, December 31, 2018, in Federal Way. In the parking lot, LaDonna recorded a video of DaShawn on her cell phone. “New haircut, truth,” DaShawn said. He took off his hat and turned in a circle to show it off. A faint scar was visible on the back of his head as he spun. “I’m doing good,” he said, beaming. “You guys see that.” 

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DaShawn Horne stands on stage with Bishop Zachary Bruce and his mother, LaDonna Horne, on Sunday, May 19, 2019, at Freedom Church of Seattle on South 125th Street. DaShawn spent the night before in the emergency room after suffering a seizure. On stage, Bishop Bruce introduced him as his miracle man. 

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